A bowl full of Sudanese ful medames with tomatoes, arugula, tomatoes andn onions on top.
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Ful Medames (Sudanese Fava Beans)

A delicious vegetarian recipe dating back to the Pharohs

Course Main Course
Cuisine Egyptian, Sudanese
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 2 hours
soaking time 8 hours
Total Time 10 hours 15 minutes
Servings 8
Calories 155 kcal
Author Darlene at International Cuisine

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Fava Bean Dry
  • 2 tsp salt or to taste
  • 2 tsp cumin or to taste
  • 2 medium tomatoes diced
  • 1 medium red onion diced
  • 1/2 cup feta cheese crumbled
  • 1 cup Arugula baby
  • 4 large hard-boiled eggs optional
  • 2 Tbsp Sesame oil

Instructions

  1. Soak the dry fava beans in water for at least 8 hours or overnight. Drain

  2. In a large pot, add in the soaked fava beans and cover with water.

  3. Bring to a boil, then reduce to simmer, and cook for about 2 hours or until the beans are soft

  4. Put your fava beans into a bowl along with some broth.

  5. Mash the beans using a potato masher or you could use a coke bottle like they do in Sudan.

  6. Add in the salt and cumin to taste.

  7. Put the beans in your serving bowl and top with some of the tomatoes, cheese, arugula, and onions, top with sesame oil and serve with some warm flat bread.

  8. You can serve the left over toppings so people can add more of what they like including the hard-boiled eggs if using. We also served it with Sudanese shata, a hot sauce.

Nutrition Facts
Ful Medames (Sudanese Fava Beans)
Amount Per Serving
Calories 155 Calories from Fat 81
% Daily Value*
Fat 9g14%
Saturated Fat 3g19%
Cholesterol 102mg34%
Sodium 723mg31%
Potassium 262mg7%
Carbohydrates 12g4%
Fiber 3g13%
Sugar 3g3%
Protein 8g16%
Vitamin A 498IU10%
Vitamin C 6mg7%
Calcium 89mg9%
Iron 1mg6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Sudanese Shata (A popular hot sauce)

Sudanese shata is a popular hot sauce that is used on many dishes in Sudan and South Sudan to spice things up a bit.  We used it on ful medames which is a delicious fava bean vegetarian dish that is considered to be the national dish.  The ful medames is served with several accompaniments and the Sudanese shata was that we really enjoyed.

a container with a popular hot sauce in Sudan called shata it has hot chili flakes, garlic and lemons.

This Sudanese shata hot sauce is made with spicy red pepper flakes, lemon juice, garlic with a bit of salt and pepper.  A quick and easy sauce to put together.  It certainly would be good on all sorts of dishes that need a bit of zip to liven them up with practically no calories.

Did you know that South Sudan is the newest country in the world?  They received their Independence in July 2011 after years of civil war.  Both Sudan and South Sudan have very impoverished people and have much work to do for peace in both nations. Sudan prior to the split was the largest country in Africa and since the split is the 3rd largest.  We pray for the people of both nations.

If you would like to learn more be sure to check out “Our Journey to Sudan and South Sudan”.  There you will find more authentic Sudanese recipes like Sudanese eggplant dip , ful Medames, and Sudanese peanut macaroons.

Craving even more?  Be sure to join the culinary and cultural journey around the world so you don’t miss a thing,  it’s free,  You can also follow me on Instagram, Facebook ,  Pinterest and youtube to follow along our journey.

Please note that this page contains affiliate links in which I will earn a small commission however, it will in no way affect the price you pay. I thank you for your support!
a container with a popular hot sauce in Sudan called shata it has hot chili flakes, garlic and lemons.
5 from 1 vote
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Sudanese Shata (A popular hot sauce)

A super quick and easy hot sauce that would be perfect to liven up just about any dish.

Course Sauce
Cuisine Sudanese
Prep Time 5 minutes
Total Time 5 minutes
Servings 8
Calories 17 kcal
Author Darlene at International Cuisine

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Lemon Juice
  • 3 cloves Garlic minced
  • 3 Tbsp Crushed Red Pepper hot
  • 1 tsp Black Pepper
  • 1 tsp salt

Instructions

  1. In a bowl, combine all the ingredients and blend or whisk together.

  2. Serve in a containter so it can easily be poured on the dish.

Nutrition Facts
Sudanese Shata (A popular hot sauce)
Amount Per Serving
Calories 17 Calories from Fat 9
% Daily Value*
Fat 1g2%
Saturated Fat 1g6%
Sodium 340mg15%
Potassium 94mg3%
Carbohydrates 4g1%
Fiber 1g4%
Sugar 1g1%
Protein 1g2%
Vitamin A 890IU18%
Vitamin C 12mg15%
Calcium 14mg1%
Iron 1mg6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Sudanese Peanut Macaroons (Ful Sudani)

Sudanese peanut macaroons are called ful Sudani. They are really quick and easy to make. We enjoyed them alongside Sudanese cinnamon tea. Peanuts are a staple ingredient in both Sudan and South Sudan.  Did you know that peanuts are not a nut but actually a legume?  Many people are surprised by that fact. They are called ground nuts in Sudan. 

A plate full of Sudanese peanut Macaroons

These little light bites are more like a peanut meringue than a macaroon you may be familiar with from France.  We loved them!

Sudan used to be one of the world’s top exporters of peanuts but its ranking has fallen in recent years, Traditional small-scale farming in Sudan’s western states produces 70% of the country’s groundnut supply. Since peanuts depend on rainfall to survive, devastating droughts in these regions have significantly affected the farmers abilities to produce high yields.

The government has high hopes for a new variety of peanut that has been developed that supposedly is more drought resistant with higher yields it is called Tafra-1.  We can only hope that this works as 70 percent of the labor force works in agriculture and the groundnuts are a source of protein in Sudanese cuisine. 

If you would like to learn more be sure to check out “Our Journey to Sudan and South Sudan”.  There you will find more authentic Sudanese recipes like Sudanese eggplant dip and ful Medames.

Craving even more?  Be sure to join the culinary and cultural journey around the world so you don’t miss a thing,  it’s free,  You can also follow me on Instagram, Facebook ,  Pinterest and youtube to follow along our journey.

Please note that this page contains affiliate links in which I will earn a small commission however, it will in no way affect the price you pay. I thank you for your support!
A plate full of Sudanese peanut macaroons.
5 from 1 vote
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Sudanese Peanut Macaroons (Ful Sudani)

A wonderful quick and easy recipe from Sudan.

Course Dessert
Cuisine Sudanese
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes
Servings 24 cookies
Calories 91 kcal
Author Darlene at International Cuisine

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Peanuts roasted and unsalted
  • 3 large egg whites
  • 1/8 tsp salt
  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 325 F

  2. Grind the unsalted, roasted peanuts to small bits reaching a grainy texture but not a powder. Set aside.

  3. In a bowl beat the egg whites with the salt until stiff

  4. Add in the powder sugar a little at a time using a low speed until fully incorporated.

  5. Add in the vanilla extract and the peanuts, stir to combine

  6. Place parchment paper on a backing sheet and place about 1 tablespoon size spoonfuls of the dough, leaving a room between each one.

  7. Bake for 15 minutes, watch closely, they should be lightly colored but not browned.

Nutrition Facts
Sudanese Peanut Macaroons (Ful Sudani)
Amount Per Serving
Calories 91 Calories from Fat 54
% Daily Value*
Fat 6g9%
Saturated Fat 1g6%
Sodium 22mg1%
Potassium 97mg3%
Carbohydrates 7g2%
Fiber 1g4%
Sugar 5g6%
Protein 4g8%
Calcium 13mg1%
Iron 1mg6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
 
 
 

 

A plate full of Sudanese peanut macaroons.
5 from 1 vote
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Sudanese Peanut Macaroons (Ful Sudani)

A wonderful quick and easy recipe from Sudan.

Course Dessert
Cuisine Sudanese
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes
Servings 24 cookies
Calories 91 kcal
Author Darlene at International Cuisine

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Peanuts roasted and unsalted
  • 3 large egg whites
  • 1/8 tsp salt
  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 325 F

  2. Grind the unsalted, roasted peanuts to small bits reaching a grainy texture but not a powder. Set aside.

  3. In a bowl beat the egg whites with the salt until stiff

  4. Add in the powder sugar a little at a time using a low speed until fully incorporated.

  5. Add in the vanilla extract and the peanuts, stir to combine

  6. Place parchment paper on a backing sheet and place about 1 tablespoon size spoonfuls of the dough, leaving a room between each one.

  7. Bake for 15 minutes, watch closely, they should be lightly colored but not browned.

Nutrition Facts
Sudanese Peanut Macaroons (Ful Sudani)
Amount Per Serving
Calories 91 Calories from Fat 54
% Daily Value*
Fat 6g9%
Saturated Fat 1g6%
Sodium 22mg1%
Potassium 97mg3%
Carbohydrates 7g2%
Fiber 1g4%
Sugar 5g6%
Protein 4g8%
Calcium 13mg1%
Iron 1mg6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Sudanese Cinnamon Tea (Shai)

Sudanese cinnamon tea called shai, went perfectly with the little light Sudanese peanut macaroons called ful sudani.    Tea and coffee and both very popular in both Sudan’s.  When tea drinking does not happen in one’s home, it is very common to find tea ladies called sitashai,  set up on street corners.  They will quite often remain in the same spot for many hours throughout the day.  Customers sit around on simple metal stools bound with colorful string, and socialize.  

A couple of cups of Sudanese cinnamon tea with sugarThis tea is really easy to make, it would typically be made with a simple black tea and then steeped with the cinnamon sticks.  The tea could also be flavored with mint or ginger which is also very popular and authentic. Make sure to have it with sugar, one thing is certain, no matter which flavor, they like it sweet.  We enjoyed the tea with the light Sudanese peanut macaroons.

Sudan was colonized by both Egypt and Britain, certainly the tea culture comes from the English.  January 1st is the day that the Sudanese celebrate National Day, the day they got their Independence back in 1956. Although much has transpired since then.  If you would like to learn more be sure to check out “Our Journey to Sudan and South Sudan”,  there you will also find more authentic recipes like Sudanese eggplant dip and ful medames

Craving even more?  Be sure to join the culinary and cultural journey around the world so you don’t miss a thing,  it’s free,  You can also follow me on Instagram, Facebook ,  Pinterest and youtube to follow along our journey.

Please note that this page contains affiliate links in which I will earn a small commission however, it will in no way affect the price you pay. I thank you for your support!

A couple of cups of Sudanese cinnamon tea with sugar
5 from 1 vote
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Sudanese Cinnamon Tea (Shai)

A wonderful way to enjoy a cup of tea.

Course Drinks
Cuisine Sudanese
Prep Time 2 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings 2
Calories 55 kcal
Author Darlene at International Cuisine

Ingredients

  • 2 cups water
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 1 Tbsp black tea leaves
  • 2 Tbsp sugar or to taste

Instructions

  1. Bring 2 cups of water to a boil with 2 cinnamon sticks

  2. When boiling, pour over the tea leaves or bags

  3. Let steep until desired flavor

  4. Add sugar as desired

Nutrition Facts
Sudanese Cinnamon Tea (Shai)
Amount Per Serving
Calories 55 Calories from Fat 9
% Daily Value*
Fat 1g2%
Saturated Fat 1g6%
Sodium 13mg1%
Carbohydrates 15g5%
Fiber 2g8%
Sugar 12g13%
Protein 1g2%
Calcium 42mg4%
Iron 1mg6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

 

Sri Lankan Spiced Chickpeas (Kadala Thal Dala)

Sri Lankan spiced chickpeas called Kadal thal dala is a very common snack.  They are often served in little paper cones or bags straight from the fire.  Chickpeas are a healthy snack and exceptionally tasty all spiced up.  Sri Lankan spiced chickpeas are also served as a side dish.

A bowl of Sri Lankan spiced chickpeasSri Lankan spiced chickpeas cook up in a jiffy especially if you use canned chickpeas.  Of course, you can make them from dry chickpeas just follow the  package instructions.  What I love about this recipe is the versatility, feel free to add in more heat if that is your thing or spices that you like. The possibilities are simply endless.

Sri Lanka is known for its curries.  Being part of the spice trade for centuries Sri Lanka is also known as the Spice Island.  This recipe calls for curry leaf called karapincha  which can be found in most Sri-Lankan gardens.  If you don’t have access to these fresh leaves you can buy them dried here.  I highly recommend you try cooking with curry leaves, they are delicious.

Black mustard seeds are also used in this recipe.  The black seeds may be hard to find at your local grocery so you can get them here.  If you can find yellow ones just double the amount as they are not quite as pungent as the black ones.  Both colors pop while they cook when it releases the strong mustard aroma.   Please note that both the curry leaves and the black mustard are used in the other dishes we made for our IC meal.  Sri Lankan prawn curry and the Sri Lankan roasted curry powder.

Did you know that Sri Lanka is the world’s leading exporter of cinnamon spice?  Sri Lanka contributes eighty percent of the world’s output.  Do you know where cinnamon actually comes from?  It actually comes from the inner bark of a tree.  If you would like to learn more about this fascinating little spice island be sure to check out “Our Journey to Sri Lanka”  you will also find more authentic recipes as well.

Craving even more?  Be sure to join the culinary and cultural journey around the world so you don’t miss a thing,  it’s free,  You can also follow me on Instagram, Facebook ,  Pinterest and youtube to follow along our journey.

Please note that this page contains affiliate links in which I will earn a small commission however, it will in no way affect the price you pay. I thank you for your support!

A bowl of Sri Lankan spiced chickpeas
5 from 1 vote
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Sri Lankan Spiced Chickpeas (Kadala Thal Dala )

A healthy snack that cooks up in a jiffy!

Course Appetizer
Cuisine Sri Lankan
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 4
Calories 84 kcal
Author Darlene at International Cuisine

Ingredients

Ingredients

  • 2 Tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 tsp mustard seeds
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds
  • 10 curry leaves
  • 4 dried red chilies chopped into large chunks
  • 1 large onion finely diced
  • 2 15 oz. chickpeas cans (drained)
  • Salt to taste

Instructions

Instructions

  1. Heat the coconut oil in a large frying pan.
  2. Fry the mustard seeds, cumin, curry leaves and chilies for around 30 seconds until you hear the seeds pop.
  3. Add the onions and cook until soft and golden.
  4. Stir through the chickpeas and add salt to taste. Sauté for a few minutes until heated through.
  5. Serve warm as a snack or as a side to your meal.
Nutrition Facts
Sri Lankan Spiced Chickpeas (Kadala Thal Dala )
Amount Per Serving
Calories 84 Calories from Fat 63
% Daily Value*
Fat 7g11%
Saturated Fat 6g38%
Sodium 3mg0%
Potassium 74mg2%
Carbohydrates 5g2%
Fiber 1g4%
Sugar 2g2%
Protein 1g2%
Vitamin A 130IU3%
Vitamin C 60mg73%
Calcium 24mg2%
Iron 1mg6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

 

Sri Lankan Roasted Curry Powder

Sri Lankan roasted curry powder is an essential spice blend to make Sri Lankan curries.  Sri Lanka also known as the Spice Island is famous for its curries.  As every family likely has their own spice blend that they use for various curries, most will have the same basic flavors of Sri Lanka.  Feel free when you make your roasted Sri Lankan roasted curry powder to adjust to your liking.  This is the one I used to make the Sri Lankan Prawn curry for our International Cuisine meal.

Sri Lankan roasted curry powder surrounded by the ingredients that make it. Coriander seed, cumin seed, whole clove, black peppercorns, black mustard seed, fennel seed, basmati rice, cardomom pods. This spice blend is roasted and then ground together.  You can use a spice grinder or do it the right way with a granite mortar and pestle called gal wangediya in Sri Lanka. 

Other spices that you may want to include in your spice blend include star anise, nutmeg, fenugreek, cinnamon, mace and ginger to simply name a few.  All these spices are used regularly in Sri Lankan cuisine.

Sri Lanka is a tropical Island paradise that was a stop on the historic Oceanic Silk Road.  Sri Lanka brought the world cinnamon and black pepper two indigenous spices found on the island.

Did you know that Sri Lanka is one of the world’s largest exporters of tea and cinnamon?  If you would like to learn more about  this beautiful Island nation be sure to check out “Our Journey to Sri Lanka”.  There you will get authentic Sri Lankan recipes like pol sambal  and much more.

Craving even more?  Be sure to join the culinary and cultural journey around the world so you don’t miss a thing,  it’s free,  You can also follow me on Instagram, Facebook ,  Pinterest and youtube to follow along our journey.

Please note that this page contains affiliate links in which I will earn a small commission however, it will in no way affect the price you pay. I thank you for your support!

Sri Lankan roasted curry powder surrounded by the ingredients that make it. Coriander seed, cumin seed, whole clove, black peppercorns, black mustard seed, fennel seed, basmati rice, cardomom pods.
5 from 1 vote
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Sri Lankan Roasted Curry Powder

A lovely spice blend which will set the tone for your Sri Lankan curry dish.

Course Seasoning
Cuisine Sri Lankan
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 8 minutes
Total Time 13 minutes
Servings 8 Tablespoons
Calories 46 kcal
Author Darlene at International Cuisine

Ingredients

Ingredients:

  • 4 Tbsp coriander seeds
  • 3 Tbsp cumin seeds
  • 2 Tbsp black peppercorns
  • 2 Tbsp basmati rice
  • 1 Tbsp black mustard seeds
  • 3 tsp whole cloves
  • 2 tsp green cardamom seeds
  • 1 tsp fennel seeds

Instructions

Instructions:

  1. Place the rice in a non-stick pan.
  2. Heat over medium heat until the rice starts to turn light brown.
  3. Add the rest of the spices and roast for few more minutes until the spices start to become aromatic. Keep moving the pan to prevent the spices from burning.
  4. Remove from the heat and let the spices cool down.
  5. Once cool, use a spice grinder (or a mortar and pestle) to grind the spice mix into a powder.
  6. Store in an air tight container.
Nutrition Facts
Sri Lankan Roasted Curry Powder
Amount Per Serving
Calories 46 Calories from Fat 18
% Daily Value*
Fat 2g3%
Saturated Fat 1g6%
Sodium 7mg0%
Potassium 121mg3%
Carbohydrates 8g3%
Fiber 2g8%
Sugar 1g1%
Protein 2g4%
Vitamin A 42IU1%
Vitamin C 1mg1%
Calcium 61mg6%
Iron 2mg11%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.